Parasitology Training Manual

Safety Issues


A number of reagents are used in the fixation, concentration and mounting procedures.
They include a number of alcohols, ether, formalin, concentrated hydrochloric acid,
ammonium hydroxide and xylene.
Follow good laboratory practice, wear the appropriate personal protective equipment(P.P.E.)
provided and ensure adequate ventilation at all times when working with these reagents.
Material safety data sheets(M.S.D.S.) are available for all of them.
Listed below are the hazards found with the various reagents used in the procedures.

Reagent Cat. # Hazards P.P.E. * Spill Procedure
Ammonium Hydroxide Soln. BDH/ACS033 contact burns
IRT
Nitrile gloves, fume hood, safety
goggles, plastic apron
Contain with inert absorbent
material dike, dilute with
water and mop up
Ether, Anhydrous BDH/9237 Highly flammable,
IRT, HS, CNS
depressant
goggles, fume hood, gloves Absorb with an inert
absorbent material and
flush spill site with water
Ethyl Alcohol BDH/B85001 IRT, T, pos repro
effects, poss Ter,
poss Mut.
gloves, fume hood, goggles
plastic apron
Absorb with an inert
absorbent material and
wash spill site with soap
and water. Ventilate well
Formalin 10% and
formaldehyde soln.
Fisher SF1004 F/C, IRT, poss
repro effects, CNS
depression, poss
Cg, poss ter
goggles, gloves, periodic
monitoring of chemical level is
required in microbiology
department
Absorb with an inert
absorbent material, wash
spill site with soap and
water
Haematoxylin
Powder
BDH/B34037 IRT gloves, dust mask or fume
hood, goggles, plastic apron
Sweep up and bag for
disposal. Wash spill site
with soap and water
Haematoxylin
Solution
Fisher/SH26500 IRT, sensitizer,
poss CNS, Ter and
repro effects
goggles and gloves absorb with an inert
absorbent material
Hydrochloric Acid BDH/ACS393 Severe contact
burns, IRT, HS,
poss Ter
Neoprene, nitrile or PVC
gloves, fume hood, goggles
plastic apron
Neutralize with soda ash
and transfer to container
for disposal. Wash site
with soap and water
Kinyoun
Carbolfuchsin stain
and decolorizer
PML/R5895
R5915
F/C, HS, T, IRT goggles and gloves absorb with inert
absorbent material, wash
spill site with soap and
water
Permount Fisher SP15 IRT goggles, gloves absorb with inert
absorbent material
Picric Acid BDH R01126 IRT gloves, fume hood, goggles
plastic apron
Absorb with inert
absorbent material and
package for disposal.
Wash spill site with soap and water
Picric Acid
saturated Soln.
BNH VW3347 explosive when
dried, HS, pos Mut
gloves, fume hood, goggles
plastic apron
absorb with inert
absorbent material and
package for disposal.
Wash spill site with soap
water
SAF Fixative BDH/R04651 IRT, sensitizer, Cg
Poss repro, Ter &
Mut effects
gloves, fume hood goggles Absorb with inert
absorbent material and
package for disposal.
wash spill site with soap
and water.

Storage And Handling of Chemicals in the Workplace

  1. It is law that a list of dangerous chemicals is available to all workers.Please refer to the MSD sheets
    in your laboratory or department.

  2. Storage

    1. Away from offices and emergency exits
    2. Adequate ventilation(at roof/floor and air conditioning)
    3. Large bottles on lower shelves
    4. If possible store in large tray to catch any leaks if one should occur
    5. Do not store incompatible substances together
    6. Store flammable/combustible substances in a flammable storage cabinet, (metal container
      usually red in color that locks and therefore contains and isolates the chemicals)
    7. Keep highly flammable material(with a low flash point) in a safety can. The cans are
      usually grounded therby eliminating the issue of static electicity starting a fire or
      explosion when pouring or decanting the substance.
    8. Purchase safety coated bottles that have a rubber coating, that will contain the spill
      should breakage occur.
    9. Use acid bottle carriers(thick rubber bucket with handle) to transport large bottles
      of acid or any glass container.

  3. Labelling

    1. All bottles and secondary containers should be promptly labelled(according to WHMIS)
    2. The labels should be clearly visible and easy to read. If you cannot read the label do not use the chemical
      report to supervisor.
    3. Never use a strong substance from an unlabelled container.

  4. Mixing Chemicals

    1. Add one substance to another slowly and observe for any unexpected reactions.
    2. When diluting concentratedm solutions always pour chemicals into water(or diluant) this
      prevents the heat of dilution from causing overheating and splattering.
    3. Ensure solutions are completely mixed using a glass stirring rod.
    4. When pouring liquid chemicals from a bottle, pour with the label facing upwards so as
      to prevent drips from destroying the label.
    5. Direct the mouth of the bottle away from yourself and coworkers when pouring.
    6. Do not pour unused portions back into the bottle to prevent contamination of the
      larger container.
    7. If a bottle cap or stopper is stuck, refrain from using too much force. Some substances
      can explode when there is a lot of friction. i.e. Picric acid and old ether bottles.

    NOTE: If a chemical spill occurs use a chemical spill kit specific to the category of chemical.
    The most common are the solvent kit and the acid and base spill kits. The kits come with all
    the equipment needed to contain, neutralize and collect the waste product. Read the spill kit
    instructions carefully and always report the incident to a supervisor.

    If you accidentally spill a chemical on yourself, immediately wash the affected part of your
    body. The eye wash station should be used to flush the eyes. The safety shower should be
    used if the spill is burning large parts of your body. If it is a smaller spill, remove
    spoiled garments and wash hands and face thoroughly.

    Fatigue

    Fatigue can be reduced at the microscope by using proper posture and stretching periodically
    to relieve tension. Eye strain can be greatly reduced at the microscope by using
    Kohler Illumination principles and the proper light intensity.

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